Gatland-One-Name-Study

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1 "A History and Biographical Cyclopaedia of Butler County Ohio, with Illustrations and Sketches of its Representative Men and Pioneers" Source (S632)
 
2 "A History and Biographical Cyclopaedia of Butler County Ohio, with Illustrations and Sketches of its Representative Men and Pioneers" Source (S633)
 
3 "American Surnames, by Elsdon C. Smith, 1969, PA, Chilton Book Company Had an ancestor who cam brom Cheetham "homestead by a forest" in Lancashire. CHEATHAM, Louis Robertson (I321)
 
4 "Book of Irish Names," by Rona Coghlan, Sterling Publishing NY 1989. Herbert=(Hoireabard)(M)Germanic, "army bright", This is a rare name in Ireland, but it enjoyed a certain vogue around the turn of the century.

John-Herbert-Gatlin_Lula-Ma
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=f410afeb-ca90-4fc8-8011-38bcffebb9fb&tid=1458274&pid=1093

Wonderful Memories
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=6a840b6c-e011-44fb-92ae-6b61ede85489&tid=1458274&pid=1093

Herbert Nicholas Gatlin
http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=7548f534-ed19-450c-a96b-d3157ed29642&tid=1458274&pid=1093
 
GATLIN, Herbert N (I9848)
 
5 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. GATLIN, Julia L (I7)
 
6 "British Listed Buildings". Digital images. Pilstye Farmhouse, Balcombe. http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/en-302377-pilstye-farmhouse-balcombe. English Heritage. Listed building text is Crown Copyright. Reproduced under licence. PSI Click-use licensce number C2008002006. Source (S257)
 
7 "Cherokee Footprints? By: Charles O. Walker Volume I Copyright 1988 Privately printed March 1988 by Industrial Printing Service, Inc. Route #10, Box 216, Arbor Hill Rd. Canton GA 30114 Copies available from: Charles O. Walker 573 Church St. Jasper GA 30143 p. 87 "BAPTIST EFFORTS AMONG THE CHEROKEES" Very few Baptists had had any contact with the Cherokees at the turn of the 19th century. Their limited knowledge would have come from: 1. personal contact through trade; 2. personal encounter through raids by the Cherokees or retaliation; 3. impersonal encounter when Cherokees came to towns to buy goods; 4. or through horror stories of past Cherokee raids and killings. Consequently, little thought was given to these people who lived beyond the frontier borders of Georgia. Baptists were few and if 10% had ever seen a Cherokee in 1800 the total number would be less than 700! Yet, at the turn of the century, ministers attending the Powelton Conferences were aware of their Indian neighbors and proposed that a witness be given them. Thomas Johnson of Georgia Baptist Association responded and preached to the Cherokees on their eastern border. Later Dozier Thornton and John Sandridge of Sarepta Baptist Association began itinerant preaching among the Cherokees. They were joined by Littleton Meeks and in 1818 were supported financially by the Sarepta Mission Society. Evan Jones, an independent Baptist preacher spent a week at Spring Place in April 1805 with the Moravians and James Vann. He preached several times, assisted by the Moravians. Moving on to the Agency in Tennessee, he had another week's meeting. Jones settled at Valley Towns (Andrews, North Carolina) and established a strong mission station. Humphrey Posey of North Carolina joined Jones c. 1818. Later, before the Removal, Posey served in the Ringgold area. Several times the Moravians recorded his visits with them and with the Cherokees who held him in high regard. In 1818 the half-Cherokee Wat Adair operated a school five miles north of today's Clarksville. In his building that year, the Bethlehem Baptist Church was constituted with 18 members. Bethlehem joined Tugalo Association in 1822. The present church, on Lake Burton Road at Clarksville, has George Deadwyler as pastor and is in Hambersham Association. "TINSWATTEE SCHOOL?DAWSON" Sarepta Baptist Mission Society opened Tinsawattee School at Big Savannah located near the junction of Tinsawattee (Nor Mill) Creek and the Etowah River. A day school rather than a boarding school, there was a house for the missionary, a school building, a horse stable and smoke house. The school opened April 4, 1821 with Duncan O'Bryant teaching the 28 scholars. "This site was elevated, offered a fine view of the bottoms, and situated in the middle of the Big Savannah." (Goff) Born in 1785 or 1786, O'Bryant and his wife Martha had 10 children. He evidently had contacts with the Cherokees. In the early 1820's he was a member of Wahoo Creek Baptist Church near Dahlonega, Lumpkin County and Yellow Creek Baptist Church in Hall County. Under his leadership, the school prospered and the Society applied for the Triennial Baptist Convention to take control of the operation and apply to the U. S. Department of War for their $250 annual support. Jesse Mercer and Adie4l Sherwood were asked by the Convention to check on the Valley Towns and Tinsawattee operations. Littleton Meeks was appointed nonresident superintendent of Tinsawattee. ************************************************************************** ************************************************************************ MEEKS, Littleton (I282)
 
8 "England, Warwickshire, Parish Registers, 1535-1984," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XXYT-TRS : 23 July 2017), William Borrer Tracy in entry for William Osbert Tracy, 23 Jun 1900, Christening; citing Lillington, Warwickshire, England, Record Office, Warwick; FHL microfilm 1,067,488. TRACY, William Osbert (I35588)
 
9 "Granny" Mary Lafayette Dyer King http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=df76ac98-46a5-43b7-9972-839f4f4bdbc8&tid=1458274&pid=499 DYER, Mary Lafayette (I325)
 
10 "Illustrated."|||Includes bibliographical references (p. 866-898) and index. Source (S715)
 
11 "John H. Gatlin" OR "John H. * Gatlin" OR "Gatlin, John H." - Google Search http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=db92f1cb-cf62-456e-99ad-08d06e27c417&tid=1458274&pid=3418 GATLIN, John H. (I11330)
 
12 "Married on Thursday, se'enight at the Friends' Meeting House, Canterbury, W. C. Marten, of this town, to Mary Scales, of Corlinge, near Folkestone, Kent." Sussex Advertiser, March, 1824. "W. C. and F. Marten, Drapers and Tailors, etc. Take this opportunity of returning their sincere thanks to their friends for past favours and beg to inform them and the public in general that they have added the above business (late conducted by James Keating) to their own concern, respectfully soliciting the transfer of favours conferred on James Keating, which they trust to merit by assiduity and attention, on moderate charges and discount allowed for prompt payment. Lewes, 3 Month, 1st, 1824." Sussex Advertiser, December 31st, 1827. 'oW. C. and F. Marten, Drapers, Tailors etc., 168, High Street, Lewes. In gratefully acknowledging the Favours they have so long experienced from their numerous Friends, take the opportunity of informing them and the Public that they have disposed of their Business to Joseph Maxfield who will continue the same on their long established Premises, and for which they solicit their support. Lewes, 12th Mo. 29th, 1827." Sussex Advertiser, March 24th, 1828. "Died yesterday morning William Crrittenden Martin this place in his 37th year." MARTIN, William Cruttenden (I24705)
 
13 "North Carolina Land Grants in Tennessee, 1778 - 1791" P. 83 - Greene County 1789 - lists James King being granted 50 acres on Blairs Branch northside Holston. KING, James (I10055)
 
14 "North Carolina Land Grants in Tennessee, 1778 - 1791" P. 83 - Greene County 1789 - lists James King being granted 50 acres on Blairs Branch northside Holston. KING, James (I10058)
 
15 "The adjutant general of Ohio is hereby authorized to secure the publication in book form of a complete roster ... the data for which has already been collected by the Ohio Daughters of the American Revolution"--P.3.|||Vol. 2. has title: The official roster of the soldiers of the American Revolution who lived in the state of Ohio ... / compiled by Mrs. Orville D. Dailey. [S.l.] : Daughters of the American Revolution of Ohio, [1938].|||Vol. 3. has title: Official roster III, soldiers of the American Revolution who lived in the state of Ohio. [S.l. : Daughters of the American Revolution of Ohio], 1959.|||Typescript note tipped in at p. 193 of v.3.|||Includes bibliographical references and indexes. Source (S721)
 
16 "The adjutant general of Ohio is hereby authorized to secure the publication in book form of a complete roster ... the data for which has already been collected by the Ohio Daughters of the American Revolution"--P.3.|||Vol. 2. has title: The official roster of the soldiers of the American Revolution who lived in the state of Ohio ... / compiled by Mrs. Orville D. Dailey. [S.l.] : Daughters of the American Revolution of Ohio, [1938].|||Vol. 3. has title: Official roster III, soldiers of the American Revolution who lived in the state of Ohio. [S.l. : Daughters of the American Revolution of Ohio], 1959.|||Typescript note tipped in at p. 193 of v.3.|||Includes bibliographical references and indexes. Source (S515)
 
17 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. BALDY, Carolyn Joan (I353)
 
18 'Parishes: Hawkhurst', The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 7 (1798), pp. 142-157. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=63402&strquery=Gatland Date accessed: 03 March 2011. Source (S436)
 
19 (My Reference #11) Family Tree Maker, CD450, P. 203, County and Family Histories: OH, 1780-1970, Disk 5, Preble County, Harrison Township, Broderbund Software, Inc., Banner Blue Division, "History Of Preble County, Ohio." ...About this time Joseph Singer came into the settlement. He came on ffot from Virginia, and camped with the Indians for a year or two. He afterwards settled on the west bank of Twin creek, on section thirty-four. His wife was Elizabeth Rape. He had thirteen children, all of who lived to raise families. Two of his sons, John and Abraham, are now residents of Lewisburgh. John's present residence is on the site where his father built his first cabin, a little affair about fourteen by eighteen feet. ... SINGER, Joseph (I1431)
 
20 (My reference #14) P. 849, Family Tree Maker, CD450, County and Family Histories: OH, 1780-1970, Disk 5, Stark County, Biographical Sketches, Broderbund Software, Inc., Banner Blue Div. JACOB M. WALK, P. O. Osnaburg; is one of the most earnest and driving farmers in the vicinity of Osnaburg, who was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, August 26, 1824, son of Samuel and CHRISTINA (MILLER) WALK, Mr. Walk was a posthumous child. His mother remained a widow for eight years, when she married a second time to MR. JOHN SINGER, Mr. Walk remained with his mother until his twenty-first year. In 1838 he removed to Stark Co. by wagon, spending a fornight upon the route. In the spring of the following year he moved with his parents to near the present village of Mapleton. Since that date the village has been organized and built up, Mr. Walk still remembering the first sale of the lots which rnaged in price form $15 to $30. MR. SINGER being a weaver by profession, his step-son learned the business of coverlid weaving in 1842, at which occupation he remained until 1860, investing his surplus funds in real estate, and doing some farming. He purchased his first home of 20 acres, one-half mile soutwest of Mapleton, He subsequently made a purchase of the "Baker" farm, a rich body of land lying three-quarters of a mile west of Mapleton, a farm of 96 acres. This land not being extensive enought to satisfy his ambition, he moved to Wayne Co., where he engaged more estensively in general agriculture. While absent he sold the Baker farm and pur hased the present farm and coal bank of 145 acres, a short distance soutwest of Osnaburg, bordering on one side of Connotton Valley Ralilroad. With his near access to the railroad for his coal, a ric h farm and an eligible building locality, Mr. Walk has reason to be content as he is. He was untied in marriage to Miss Catharine Staub of Osnaburg Tp. Dec. 31, 1846. She was born in Prussia, coming to America at an early age of three years. Mrs. Catharine Walk died in 1874, leaving three sons and two daughters--Mary E., the eldest daughter, is an instructor in music in Osnaburg and several of the neighboring villages. Ellen C. is at home. Both of the daughters are members of the M.E. Church and S. S. Mr. Walk was re-married to Mrs. Lucinda Clark of this county; they have one child, a boy of fourteen months christened Jacob Howard. In politics Mr. Walk was raised a Democrat, and remained of that faith until the "Know-Nothing" party sprang up, when he became a Republican. Mr. Walk is an uncompromising adv o cate of temperance, his zeal having made him hated by the "beer element" of the neighborhood, having b een active in prosecuting several saloonists. Mr. Walk was chosedn chairman of the Christian Temperance Union. In his religious life few have lived more active and consisten. He was confirmed in the Lutheran Church at 16 years of age, and had his entire family baptized in the same. For many years there being no Sabbath-school at Mapleton, he with a few others su cc eeded in organizing one, he bieng chosen first superintendent. He held the supoerintendency also during his residence in Wayne Co., and has been repeatedly chosen to that position and as teacher since his residence in Osnaburg. Mr. Walk has never been an office-holder or seeker, but his fellow-townsmen sent him as one of the committee of three to secure the incorporat;ion of the village of Osnaburg, and he was also member of the first twon council.... WALK, Jacob M. (I1436)
 
21 (Taken from the notes of Youvonne Rachel Craddock Morrow.) 1. At death, her body lay in-state at the Phillips Robinson Funeral Home. On Saturday morning at 10AM, Reverend Alfred Bennett delivered her farwell sermon. The pall bearers were Charles W. Pardue, Charles E. Russ, Charlie E. Pullen, Robert T. Boyd, Thomas W. Pettit, Robert T. Hash. She was buried in Spring Hill Cemetary in Nashville Tennessee. 2. It was said by her son, James LeRoy Craddock, in his court trial for sexual child abuse of his own child; that his mother, Virginia, had also sexually abused him as a child. Cheatham Sisters http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=42a75d3f-ac27-4c4b-81a0-0244303f0c5a&tid=1458274&pid=10 Virginia Craddock http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=41959e8b-98ec-4e28-b889-028d269ca701&tid=1458274&pid=10 Young Marrieds http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=2a64cfb2-0950-4666-9195-3c8f3e443501&tid=1458274&pid=10 Grandmother and Granddaughter http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=af0c3824-e1d1-47f7-8d0c-6d318ef898b9&tid=1458274&pid=10 A Moving Perspective of the Life of Virginia Cheatham http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=c9a9c787-2472-4782-aa74-9014dd0ad159&tid=1458274&pid=10 A young Virginia Isabell Cheatham http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=7bbb29b5-53dc-43d7-a506-bd8d89c9c9f5&tid=1458274&pid=10 Class photo http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=509ed1e7-a3f9-47c9-b51d-d6e1d19fd719&tid=1458274&pid=10 Virginia Isabel Cheatham Craddock http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=4f457f25-ab05-4885-bf94-fa8f2ecebe3f&tid=1458274&pid=10 CHEATHAM, Virginia Isabell (I15385)
 
22 ************************************************************************** ************************************************************************** ** Can M = Marcus? ************************************************************************** ************************************************************************** ** MEEKS, M. H. (I216)
 
23 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- USS CULGOA By Patrick McSherry -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- GENERAL: The CULGOA was a refrigerated supply ship that was used to provide food and stores to the American naval forces in the Manila Bay during the naval blockade of the city and bay. Later the ship saw service with the American Great White Fleet. BACKGROUND: CULGOA was a steel-hulled vessel built by J. L. Thompson & Son of Sunderland, England in 1889 or 1890. The vessel was purchased by the U.S. Navy at Cavite during the naval blockade of Manila on June 4, 1898. During the hot summer of the blockade, the vessel supplied the American squadron with ice and meat. Since she was not yet commissioned as a naval vessel, and was still officially a merchant vessel, CULGOA was able to purchase supplies and bring them to Manila, avoiding the neutrality laws which would preclude the sale of such supplies to the navy. It is possibly for this reason that her merchant name was retained. With the final signing of the Treaty of Paris, which ended the Spanish American War, being a week away, CULGOA was finally commissioned as a U.S. Naval vessel on December 3, 1898. Lt. Commander J. W. Carlin was placed in command. In October 20, 1899 CULGOA went in for an overhaul in Hong Kong. The overhaul was completed on November 18, 1899. Following the refit, the vessel, she again began her supply duties in the Philippines, aiding the American forces who were now embroiled in the Philippine-American War. In 1900 and 1901 she made three trips to Brisbane, Australia for fresh supplies. On July 22, 1901, the vessel left Cavite and steamed for New York by way of the Suez Canal. She arrived in New York on September 25, 1901. A few days later, on October 1, she was decommissioned in Boston. In 1902 CULGOA was recommissioned and again began supply duties, this time in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico. On August 11, 1905 CULGOA was again placed out of commission and was actually struck from the navy rolls on May 7, 1906. A few weeks later, on June 30, she was reinstated. The vessel was recommissioned on September 12, 1907 for services with the Atlantic Fleet. CULGOA was briefly loaned to Panama Railway Company for a run with much needed beef, before joining the Atlantic Battleship Fleet and the Great White Fleet Cruise. On the cruise, CULGOA was one of four auxiliaries to accompany the sixteen battleships. During the cruise, while on a planned supply run, she carried naval artist Henry Reuterdahl, who had been ordered away from the fleet for negative comments to the press. She also aided in wireless communications between the fleet's squadrons and brought emergency supplies to Messina, Italy, which had been ravaged by an earthquake. Returning to the U.S. east coast in 1909, she again began normal supply duties. Between 1910 and 1918, she visited Europe once, and brought supplies to forces involved in intervention activities in Latin America. During World War One, CULGOA made seven Atlantic passages taking supplies to Great Britain and France. On one cruise, she assisted the SS OOSTERDIJK which san after colliding with the SAN JACINTO. CULGOA rescued survivors and towed SAN JACINTO to Halifax, Nova Scotia. In June of 1920, the vessel returned to the Pacific, steaming to Pearl Harbor. In September of the same year, she returned to the U.S.'s east coast. She was decommissioned at New York on December 31, 1921, and was sold on July 25, 1922. ADVANTAGES/DISADVANTAGES: This vessel would have been a god-send to the crewmen serving aboard the ship's in Dewey's Asiatic Squadron. Refrigeration was a new technology, and the only warship in the Asiatic that had refrigeration was OLYMPIA. The capability would have been most welcome. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Cap Tally from a crewman who served aboard CULGOA -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- TECHNOTES: Classification: AF (Store Ship) Launched: 1889 or 1890 Commissioned: December 3, 1898 Armament: 0ne 6-pounder (after commissioning) Rig Schooner Contractor: J. L. Thompson and Sons, Ltd. Length: 346 feet, 4 inches Beam: 43 feet Draft: 21 feet, 9 inches Gross Tonnage 3,325 tons Net Tonnage 2,135 tons Complement: Crew of 122 under the command of Lt. Cdr. J. W. Carlin Speed 13 knots Engine Type: Two compound engines, 2 shafts. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Bibliography: Clerk of the Joint Committee on Printing, The Abridgement of the Message from the President of the United States to the Two Houses of Congress, Vol. 2, Washington DC: Government Printing Office, 1899. Naval History Department, Department of the Navy, Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, Vol. II, Washington DC: Government Printing Office, 1963, 213-214 Hart, Robert A., The Great White Fleet - Its Voyage Around the World, 1907-1909 (Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, 1865) 51, 174, 279, 281. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Return to US Navy Return to Main Page GATLIN, Murray Nicholas (I7823)
 
24 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. CRADDOCK, James LeRoy (I8)
 
25 101 Walnut Street, Lindale GA listed for Lula in Richard Corbin's Indian Wars pension file. CORBIN, Elluna Frances (I13512)
 
26 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. FERGUESON, Peggy (I9864)
 
27 12118 Walnut Park Crossing #1028 Austin TX USA Jeffrey being held by his sister, Youvonne. http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=157c1636-0b67-4b4c-8868-088235f9dde3&tid=1458274&pid=8 Jeff in Grand Gatlin's Chair http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=d26bf8a5-6534-469f-a63d-340e4b77aca0&tid=1458274&pid=8 Jeff the day he came home from the hospital. http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=cfe6795c-33d0-460e-a2aa-3a8f53812391&tid=1458274&pid=8 Art http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=83768060-f84c-4b27-b0cd-486a0abcfe75&tid=1458274&pid=8 Jeff in Walker http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=490e2f9e-567d-43b4-8c33-550d65a2c17b&tid=1458274&pid=8 Little Bear http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=1dcc635d-9598-41d3-b310-869e23a87b2c&tid=1458274&pid=8 Jeff Craddock http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=ed2c859d-861c-4b65-afad-98bf2470666f&tid=1458274&pid=8 Certificate of Baptism http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=371f448c-271c-446d-ba73-9baa0cd7d62b&tid=1458274&pid=8 Jeff as a newborn. http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=1af0dcb6-1687-47d0-8d3c-e5d16bb286e5&tid=1458274&pid=8 CRADDOCK, Jeffrey Alan (I6)
 
28 125 Eight St. Zanesville OH USA Death certificate #12187 reveals that Julia was buried at Mt. Calvrey in Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio on March 2, 1917 (8). Alice Yorlty (sp) was the person who reported her death. Alice's address was listed as 121 English St. Zanesville. Julia's father's name may be spelled Capion. Margaret Fetherling Gatlin thought that the name was spelled Champion. Margaret Fetherling's birth certificate listed Julia Campion's birthplace as Indiana. Matthew Fetherling's birth certificate listed Julia Campion's birthplace as Ohio, then struck out and Indiana written in. Also she was listed as 38 years old as was on Margaret's birth certificate. Aunt Mae's birth certificate request, before receiving the certified copy, revealed that Julia was from Logansport, Indiana. Other possible spellings: Camprin, Compton, Camfton Aunt Catherine's handwritten note to Margaret Fetherling Gatlin shows Julia's birth date as March 4, 1877, and death date as February 15, 1918. JuliaCampion http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=01563856-9357-4a6f-8715-27298f02674c&tid=1458274&pid=12119 CAMPION, Julia (I9862)
 
29 1615 11th Ave. North GATLIN, Alice E (I738)
 
30 1628 will transcribed HEYBORNE, Katherine (I29989)
 
31 1700 Continuing deeds - ref. WISTON/34-61 - date: 1700-1827 John Shelley, at the direction of John Stone of Nunnery in Rusper, gent., and John Monke of Old Shoreham, esq. (exors. of the will (no. WISTON/33) of Thomas Beard, jnr.), assign the mortgage, 24 Nov. 1700, with a bond of even date, to John Laker of Wisborough Green, yeo. (nos. WISTON/34-36), who assigned it, 22 May 1703, to Francis Minshull of Thames Street, London, merchant (no. WISTON/37). There is a letter, 20 Sept. 1703, from Thomas Beard [snr.] to John Warden at Butlers Green [in Cuckfield], about the debts of the writer's late son (no. WISTON/38). Following the will, 6 Dec. 1689 (admons. 30 Oct. 1703) of Richard Bridger, snr. (no. WISTON/39; see no. WISTON/25), Richard Bridger, jnr., as administrator of his father's estate, and Thomas Beard [snr.], and Elizabeth his wife, with the surviving exor. of the will of Thomas Beard, jnr., assigned their interests in the property absolutely to the said Francis Minshull, in consideration of ?270 (no. WISTON/40). On his death, his widow and five children assigned the lease, 19 Jan. 1716/7, to William Harris of London, gent. (no. WISTON/41), to whom the Rev. John Reynell, prebendary of the above prebend, granted a new lease, 14 May 1717, for three lives (no. WISTON/42), and another new lease, 28 Feb. 1720/1, on the remarriage of the lessee (no. WISTON/44), the former lease being surrendered, 30 Nov. 1720 (no. WISTON/43). William Harris assigned the lease to trustees, 30 May 1721 (no. WISTON/45). There are attested copies (1827) of two marriage settlements, 1746 and 1753, of Sarah Harris of Salisbury, co. Wilts, spinster (dau. of William Harris) with William Hayter of London, merchant, and secondly of Sarah Hayter, now widow, of Hayes, co. Kent, with Henry Southby of Cheapside, linen-draper, both of which settlements include, inter alia, the above property (nos. WISTON/46, 47). From 1754 to 1822 there are four more leases from different prebendaries, mainly to trustees, with deeds of agreement and surrenders of previous leases (nos. WISTON/48-56). The Rev. Henry Wilson of Kirby Cane, co. Norfolk, mortgaged the property for ?1,000, by assigning his lease, 19 May 1823, to Elizabeth Chessall of Nottingham Street, St. Marylebone, spinster, and Alexander Hale Strong of Lincoln's Inn, co. Middx., gent. (no. WISTON/57), followed by a further charge, 14 March 1825, with assignment of assurance policies, for securing ?3,200 and interest (no. WISTON/58). The said Henry Wilson received a release and confirmation of the estate in 1827 from the devisees and exors. under the will of Sarah Hayter (only dau. of William and Sarah Hayter, n?e Harris), and assigned the property 3, 4 Aug. 1827, to Charles Goring of Wiston Park, esq. (nos. WISTON/59-61). BEARD, Thomas (I20004)
 
32 1744 is the original date I had without source. Some say the marriage date is before 1743 Family F821
 
33 1784 was one of five deligates to convention in August forming the state of Franklin (Frankland) set new time of meeting to Greeneville November 14, 1784. STEWART, Thomas Hamilton (I433)
 
34 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. FETHERLING, Dale Singer (I15492)
 
35 1850 census of Monroe County IL list Catherine Malone as head of household. Later she is listed in his household in 1870 census of Taylorville, Christian County IL. from Jane King CROWE, John (I5266)
 
36 1850 Cherokee County AL Census: James listed as born in SC & Rebecca in NC. James, Addaline, & John listed as born in GA. Also listed on same census is Samuel (age 24 yrs GA) 1860 Cherokee County AL census: CORBIN, James (I5546)
 
37 1850 Cherokee County AL census: Nelson listed as 30 years, Riley at 6 yrs, Nancy at 3 yrs, & Nelson at 1 year. Enlisted in CSA SEP 1861 at Crossroads, Marshall County AL with Company H 1st AL. Honorably discharged in SEP / OCT 1862 in Murphysboro TN. Lived in Cherokee County AL (1850 census) & Marshall County AL (1860 census). We had an e-mailed photo of Nelson Hester & Rhoda Corbin. Would like to get it again. CORBIN, Nelson Hester (I5461)
 
38 1850 Cherokee County AL: Listed as 24 years old. Listed in James Corbin household. CORBIN, Samuel (I5454)
 
39 1850 Cherokee County GA census I know Barksdale served as a private in Capt. Scoggin's Battery, (Griffin L. Artillery), Georgia Light Artillery, and that he was killed during the Battle of Tanner's Ferry near Resaca, GA. Lay's or Tanner's Ferry was a crossing on the Oostanaula River, I've been told on a road that no longer exists. This battle took place on May 14th and 15th, after the 13th's Battle of Resaca. Gen. Johnston, who is a great uncle by marriage, had withdrawn from Dalton to Resaca after he was outflanked by the Federal Army moving along Snake Creek Gap, which was NW of Resaca. Johnston's men were on the high ground in the hills northwest of the town, and stood against repeated charges on the 14th and 15th, but then the Federals took charge of the river crossing at Lay's or Tanner's Ferry, so Johnston withdrew south to Calhoun. The Battle of Resaca was the first major battle in the campaign that ended with the Battle of Atlanta. Another of my ancestors, and I can't remember which one right now, was reading a letter to his grandson sitting on the porch of their house there near the battle when a stray bullet hit and killed him during the Battle of Resaca. -- Laurie L. Wicks CORBIN, Barksdale (I5768)
 
40 1850 Cherokee County GA census. CORBIN, Caswell (I14221)
 
41 1850 Cherokee County GA census. CORBIN, Franklin (I14223)
 
42 1850 Cherokee County GA Census: All 11 children of John & Delilah listed. CORBIN, John (I5738)
 
43 1850 Cherokee County GA census: Greenberry listed as 8/12 year. CORBIN, Greenberry (I5465)
 
44 1850 Cherokee County GA census: Rail W., Yerby, Hulda, & Martha listed. CORBIN, William Riley (I5818)
 
45 1850 Cherokee County GA census: Samuel & Violet listed as 80 years with Nancy as 40 years. CORBIN, Samuel (I5726)
 
46 1850 Cherokee County GA census: Yerby & Betsy listed as well as 11 children. CORBIN, Yerby (I5756)
 
47 1854, 20th June. Thomas Warden surrenders to Richard Weekes, of Hurstpierpoint, for ?530, per Lawrence Smith, gentleman, Goodyers, 38 acres, and Woodlands, 19 acres. Richard Weekes admitted. SMITH, Lawrence (I35363)
 
48 1870 Census lists occupation as a "work on farm". Was born in Tennessee. Can read and write. Henderson County was formed in 1821 from Indian lands. The county seat is Lexington. Census Records: Microfilm records for 1830-1920 include Henderson County. They are indexed in statewide census indexes for 1830-1870 and microfilm indexes for 1880 and 1900-1920. Records for 1850 and 1870 are also published in book form. Selected County Histories: *Henderson County (Stewart, 1979); Henderson County's history (Bolen, 1922); History of Henderson County (Powers,1930); Henderson County historical calendar 1821-1996 (Henderson County Tennessee 200 Bicentennial Committee); *Henderson County: a pictorial history (Davis); *Goodspeed's (1887). Published Local Records: *Cemetery inscriptions (Harris); Tombstone inscriptions from black cemeteries (Smith); Genealogical miscellany (Smith). *WPA typescripts include: Wills 1895-1932; County court minutes 1860-1866; Bible records & tombstone inscriptions. Local Records Microfilm: An inventory of microfilmed county records is available for purchase. Individual reels may also be purchased. Earliest records include: county court minutes from 1891; marriages from 1893; wills from 1895; deeds from 1856; and guardian and administrator settlements from 1887. Tax lists prior to 1850 are dated 1836 and 1837. The following is available on interlibrary loan: deed index 1856-1935 (1 reel). Newspapers: Newspapers were published in Lexington, Sardis and Scotts Hill. Scattered early issues are available from 1875, and a complete run begins in 1928 . Microfilms are provided to Tennessee libraries on interlibrary loan. Individual reels of microfilm may also be purchased. *Indicates this title may be borrowed on Interlibrary loan. GATLIN, Felix H. (I1463)
 
49 1870 Census taken 14 June 1870. If the Campions arrived in New York in 1870, they would have had to come prior to that date as the 1870 census was taken in Logansport, Cass County, Indiana. I'm not sure that the baptimsal record belongs to Elizabeth but added it for the time being as I rethink where they lived, and when they came to America CAMPION, Elizabeth A. (I744)
 
50 1870 Cenus said she can read and write Henderson County was formed in 1821 from Indian lands. The county seat is Lexington. Census Records: Microfilm records for 1830-1920 include Henderson County. They are indexed in statewide census indexes for 1830-1870 and microfilm indexes for 1880 and 1900-1920. Records for 1850 and 1870 are also published in book form. Selected County Histories: *Henderson County (Stewart, 1979); Henderson County's history (Bolen, 1922); History of Henderson County (Powers,1930); Henderson County historical calendar 1821-1996 (Henderson County Tennessee 200 Bicentennial Committee); *Henderson County: a pictorial history (Davis); *Goodspeed's (1887). Published Local Records: *Cemetery inscriptions (Harris); Tombstone inscriptions from black cemeteries (Smith); Genealogical miscellany (Smith). *WPA typescripts include: Wills 1895-1932; County court minutes 1860-1866; Bible records & tombstone inscriptions. Local Records Microfilm: An inventory of microfilmed county records is available for purchase. Individual reels may also be purchased. Earliest records include: county court minutes from 1891; marriages from 1893; wills from 1895; deeds from 1856; and guardian and administrator settlements from 1887. Tax lists prior to 1850 are dated 1836 and 1837. The following is available on interlibrary loan: deed index 1856-1935 (1 reel). Newspapers: Newspapers were published in Lexington, Sardis and Scotts Hill. Scattered early issues are available from 1875, and a complete run begins in 1928 . Microfilms are provided to Tennessee libraries on interlibrary loan. Individual reels of microfilm may also be purchased. *Indicates this title may be borrowed on Interlibrary loan. GATLIN, Elizabeth (I1474)
 

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