Gatland-One-Name-Study

Littleton MEEKS

Male 1766 - 1840  (73 years)


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  • Name Littleton MEEKS 
    Born 8 Feb 1766  England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Occupation 1818  Baptist Witness to Cherokee Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 1840  Banks Co., Ga. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Census 1860  Sc-Pendleton dist.-10010-0210110-0; 33; 1800 Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Occupation Nonresident Superintendent of Tinsawattee School -- Dawson GA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    _UID 5EE42437DB054C24AEF1906618FE546C5889 
    Person ID I282  Gatland
    Last Modified 15 Aug 2015 

    Family ID F10755  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family ID F10756  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Elizabeth IVEY,   b. 10 Jul 1768,   d. 27 Nov 1857, Habersham Co. Ga. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years) 
    Children 
     1. John MEEKS,   b. 1783, Pendleton District, S.C. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Mar 1876, McNairy Co. Tenn. Guys Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 93 years)
     2. Thomas Harvey MEEKS,   d. Lincoln County, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Felix Grundy MEEKS,   d. Lincoln County, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified 15 Aug 2015 
    Family ID F156  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • "Cherokee Footprints? By: Charles O. Walker Volume I Copyright 1988 Privately printed March 1988 by Industrial Printing Service, Inc. Route #10, Box 216, Arbor Hill Rd. Canton GA 30114 Copies available from: Charles O. Walker 573 Church St. Jasper GA 30143 p. 87 "BAPTIST EFFORTS AMONG THE CHEROKEES" Very few Baptists had had any contact with the Cherokees at the turn of the 19th century. Their limited knowledge would have come from: 1. personal contact through trade; 2. personal encounter through raids by the Cherokees or retaliation; 3. impersonal encounter when Cherokees came to towns to buy goods; 4. or through horror stories of past Cherokee raids and killings. Consequently, little thought was given to these people who lived beyond the frontier borders of Georgia. Baptists were few and if 10% had ever seen a Cherokee in 1800 the total number would be less than 700! Yet, at the turn of the century, ministers attending the Powelton Conferences were aware of their Indian neighbors and proposed that a witness be given them. Thomas Johnson of Georgia Baptist Association responded and preached to the Cherokees on their eastern border. Later Dozier Thornton and John Sandridge of Sarepta Baptist Association began itinerant preaching among the Cherokees. They were joined by Littleton Meeks and in 1818 were supported financially by the Sarepta Mission Society. Evan Jones, an independent Baptist preacher spent a week at Spring Place in April 1805 with the Moravians and James Vann. He preached several times, assisted by the Moravians. Moving on to the Agency in Tennessee, he had another week's meeting. Jones settled at Valley Towns (Andrews, North Carolina) and established a strong mission station. Humphrey Posey of North Carolina joined Jones c. 1818. Later, before the Removal, Posey served in the Ringgold area. Several times the Moravians recorded his visits with them and with the Cherokees who held him in high regard. In 1818 the half-Cherokee Wat Adair operated a school five miles north of today's Clarksville. In his building that year, the Bethlehem Baptist Church was constituted with 18 members. Bethlehem joined Tugalo Association in 1822. The present church, on Lake Burton Road at Clarksville, has George Deadwyler as pastor and is in Hambersham Association. "TINSWATTEE SCHOOL?DAWSON" Sarepta Baptist Mission Society opened Tinsawattee School at Big Savannah located near the junction of Tinsawattee (Nor Mill) Creek and the Etowah River. A day school rather than a boarding school, there was a house for the missionary, a school building, a horse stable and smoke house. The school opened April 4, 1821 with Duncan O'Bryant teaching the 28 scholars. "This site was elevated, offered a fine view of the bottoms, and situated in the middle of the Big Savannah." (Goff) Born in 1785 or 1786, O'Bryant and his wife Martha had 10 children. He evidently had contacts with the Cherokees. In the early 1820's he was a member of Wahoo Creek Baptist Church near Dahlonega, Lumpkin County and Yellow Creek Baptist Church in Hall County. Under his leadership, the school prospered and the Society applied for the Triennial Baptist Convention to take control of the operation and apply to the U. S. Department of War for their $250 annual support. Jesse Mercer and Adie4l Sherwood were asked by the Convention to check on the Valley Towns and Tinsawattee operations. Littleton Meeks was appointed nonresident superintendent of Tinsawattee. ************************************************************************** ************************************************************************